Month: February 2017

A Northern Winter on a Sailboat

I am not going to write about the wonders of winter sailing. I sailed to Maine in the Month of December before it really froze up here (I still had to break ice in Plymouth, MA to get out of that harbor), and I will tell you winter sailing isn’t much fun. You don’t do it because it’s a relaxing voyage, you do it because you have a purpose. I sailed here to Maine so I had a place to stay while I worked on a contract at the Shipyard. Living on a boat in winter is a different experience, although I have the advantage of shore power while docked, managing heat is still an issue when it gets super cold, like 25 degrees below zero and the wind is blowing through the harbor at 45 knots. Then it’s just hunker down under a few layer of blankets while the heater’s real job is to keep the bilge and bilge pump from freezing.

 

Here are a few pictures of a nautical winter wonderland.

Summer Camps by Jeffrey Carter

Jeffrey Carter is the Director of Rockbrook Summer Camp for Girls, a traditional girls summer camp located in Brevard, NC. He publishes the summer camp blog “The Heart of a Wooded Mountain.”
I wanted to share one of Jeffrey’s articles about Summer Camp with you, and draw some comparison with seafaring as a backdrop for some of these experiences. Some of the topics he discusses directly point to the benefits that a team working and mutual benefit program like American Seafarers brings to our youth, while other points he makes have analogs that translate well, but aren’t immediately apparent in the article because the image of summer camp is often thought of a place with cabins in the woods and doing endless activities during the day. American Seafarers is much more than a summer camp, because we are bringing the camp with us on a grand adventure that allows the kids to realize their real value and potential by being the team that makes it happen for all of us. Not only do we teach your kids how to sail, our program experiencially¬†teaches them to be responsible and accountable to themselves and to others, and also that the effort put in¬†gives you the time later when it ok to just let loose and enjoy life and enjoy the fruits of the effort you put in to it.

Parents send their children to summer camps to have fun, to experience new activities, and maybe to see a different part of the country, but there are also some incredibly important, and lasting, benefits that campers enjoy. What can parents expect their children to gain from their summer camp experience beyond the razzle-dazzle entertainment? What will stick with your kids after camp and when they’re back at home? Here are a few of the areas of self-development a summer camp experience can enhance.

Relating to others: Summer camps are highly social environments where everyone is a member of a close-knit community. At the same time, they are often quite diverse. Children will meet others from different families, from different parts of the country, even from abroad. They will also interact daily with children of different ages. These different backgrounds, values, habits and ways of living can be disconcerting at first, but with encouragement and guidance can really help a young person learn to get along with people. Another way to say this, is that by encountering kids who are “different” a child learns to see past those differences and become friends. Learning to relate like this makes it much easier to make friends later in life.

Developing Creativity: Most summer camps provide numerous opportunities to make things, to practice different crafts, and to explore the arts. From woodworking, to fiber arts, to ceramics, to knitting, to blacksmithing, and so on, there are fantastic ways to be creative. Plus, kids are encouraged to try new things, to not worry about how “good” they are, and to be excited about the process of participating. Everyone realizes that we can create some pretty cool stuff if we give it a try.

Self-Confidence: Summer camps are supportive places, communities where everyone will look out for each other, and usually encourage each other. This kind of positive peer relationship is the perfect recipe for trying new things and being proud of your accomplishments. Kids might think they won’t be able to do something (like climb a ropes course, for example), but when they try and succeed, it’s strong evidence that they can do it. Doubt is transformed into bravery, fear into confidence, and the result is an enhanced sense of self-worth.

Independence: It’s almost inevitable when a child goes to camp and sleeps away from home, away from the watchful eye of his or her parents- she will gain greater independence. Kids at camp make a lot of their own decisions, make choices about what to do, how to behave, and how to spend their free time. Of course, they also get to see the consequences of their choices too, and when it’s their choice and not their parents, those consequences are all the more meaningful.

Being suddenly responsible for their own choices, is a very formative experience in a growing habit of independence.

Social Etiquette: Being around so many people and interacting with them so closely day after day, summer camps also require kids to develop certain social skills. Sharing, recognizing others’ interests, dealing with arguments, showing empathy, being kind, offering to help, making honest suggestions- all of these are key ingredients. Every quality summer camp will create an environment where all of this is fostered and taught.

Of course most of these areas can develop at home and at school during the year, but summer camp provides an opportunity to practice these qualities, develop these aspects of a child’s personality, and further develop the mature skill that make them effective. It’s really remarkable how powerful the summer camp experience is in this regard. Sure it’s fun, but it can also be so crucially formative too.

At American Seafarers, kids gain confidence because of their successes in their accomplishments as a team, by working together to develop a plan and charting the next leg of our course, and thinking creatively about the best way to approach new challenges they haven’t experienced yet. I think Jeffrey would agree there is nothing more powerful than your kids’ successes contributing to the success of the whole team and its ability to get something real accomplished from start to finish and enjoying the end results, whether that seeing a new beach, or visiting an amazing landmark. This isn’t running the ropes course, but being part of how the entire group gets to visit one amazing location after another, and being relied upon and enjoying the sense of accomplishment by being a member of the crew that made the summer such a grand adventure, there can be no other real sense of being independent by virtue of trusting in yourself and you ability to be responsible when needed.