9/11, Sixteen Years Later

Today is 9/11 shadowed by the recent Hurricane Irma destroying people’s lives. Every year I end up watching this video and choking up yet one more time. I am humbled by all the captains of boats large and small that rushed in to get people out of ground zero and out of New York City. My hat is off to each and every one of you known and unknown heroes of the day.

 

Maritime Talks w/Captain Laurel Seaborn

I met Captain Laurel Seaborn, founder of SEAMHAP earlier this week when she was speaking at an engagement hosted at the Moffat-Ladd House and Garden in Portsmouth, NH. Captain Laurel attended East Caroline University and Mastered in Maritime History and Marine Archeology and received her PhD in Maritime History from the University of New Hampshire. Captain Laurel gave a presentation about her life on the sea, starting as a child living aboard her family’s sailboat, her life aboard tall ships, and the general benefits of attending and teaching sailing programs to all groups of people.

Laurel has crewed on several tall sailing ships of various types; Brigs, Barqantines, and Schooners. She describes the coordinated tasks aboard that need to be completed and be in a perfect state of readiness in order for things to happen smoothly just when you need them to, such as the proper way to coil lines so they pay out smoothly, or how to belay lines to a pin rail so you know exactly which line you are grabbing when it’s too dark or foggy to see where the other end leads. Helming (steering) the ship is her favorite part, it feels the most empowering because it is the one thing that you do that has immediate affect on the whole ship and what the crew needs to do. I agree, it’s a real thrill to be steering a sailing ship that is moving along at a good clip and in perfect balance with the wind and the sea. You can feel the boat become an extension of yourself.

Laurel also shared how learning to crew a ship is beneficial to a person’s personal growth. According to Laurel, crewing on a ship and learning all the tasks to make it go builds a person in three major areas:

Building Self Confidence – When you first approach sailing, you have no idea what you need to do or even how much needs to be done and done right to make a sailing ship go. First you learn smaller individual tasks like tying knots, and how to properly coil a rope, and then build upon those to develop more complex sets of skills that are used in conjunction with one another to complete varying complex jobs that need to be done. When you have learned how to do all these individual tasks, and combine and use them to accomplish more complex goals such as rigging and hoisting the sails, or charting how to get from here to there, you feel accomplished at getting something really significant done. Using those combining smaller skills to accomplish even greater and more complex goals, such as actually getting the ship underway and reaching your destination is a huge confidence builder and builds that sense that your contribution has real meaning.

 

Team Work – Team work really starts right at the beginning, because no one new knows what to do. So you are shown how to perform tasks and you shadow and you are asked to help. Not to mention some tasks require a coordinated effort between more than 2 or 3 people. Tasks such as hauling a spar. Not only will it take a few people to haul it up, it takes a few other people to coax the spar into place as it’s being lifted. Lauren said, the first time crew learns how to do this, it can take several hours to get it into place. Thank goodness, you can tie off lines when you need a break. It’s all part of being aboard a small ship and even a small boat. You quickly develop friendships when you work together and get a task that is both monumental as well as complex like that completed. You all feel you deserve a good pat on the back and kick-back for a few minutes together with a soda. You feel you are ready to take on what comes next, and it instills a real sense of community and belonging.

Sense of Belonging – From the moment you leave port for the first time, you begin to realize that you are part of this boat and part of this crew. It quickly become’s “your home” for the time you are aboard, and the people become your friends and family. Indeed lifetime friendships are developed while learning to be crew mates and accomplishing great things together. It’s an amazing experience from which everyone benefits. There is nothing like become friends as part of a team that explores the coast and experiences sites and activities that others just dream about.

 

I am very glad I met Laurel, and I hope we run into one another again. Maybe our programs might end up collaborating with one another. Who knows. We wish her the best.

 

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West Marine Blue Future Grant Recipients

 

We want to thank West Marine for their generosity and effort to help create and improve programs like ours a possibility. We are honored that West Marine has included us in the short list of recipients for Spring 2017.

 

From West Marine’s Website:

“No one understands the needs of a community better than those living and working in that community,” says Deb Radcliff, West Marine Senior Vice President, Marketing. “We think these special organizations are doing incredible work to improve access to the water, teach valuable job and life skills, and encourage young people from all backgrounds to create and treasure their very own waterlife experiences.”

 

 

 

July 4th, Independence Day

Merchant Seamen Struck First Blow for U.S. Independence

On July 4, 1776, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence, which proclaimed the independence of a new United States of America from Great Britain and its king. The declaration came 442 days after the first shots of the American Revolution were fired at Lexington and Concord in Massachusetts and marked an ideological expansion of the conflict that would eventually involve France’s intervention on behalf of the Americans.

Privateers and Mariners in the Revolutionary War

The 13 Colonies, having declared their Independence, had only 31 ships comprising the Continental Navy. To add to this, they issued Letters of Marque to privately owned, armed merchant ships and Commissions for privateers, which were outfitted as warships to prey on enemy merchant ships. Merchant seamen who manned these ships contributed to the very birth and founding of our Republic.

On June 12, 1775, near Round Island on Machias Bay the patriots crashed into the British armed schooner Margaretta and engaged in hand to hand combat. The British crew was disheartened when their captain was mortally wounded and lost the one hour long battle. 25 of the combatants were killed or wounded. The victors claimed “four double fortified three pounders and fourteen swivels” and some smaller guns.

This was considered the first sea engagement of the Revolution and the start of the merchant marine’s war role.

Because of British policy regarding import of gunpowder, the colonists did not have enough to repel the third British charge at Bunker Hill. A survey by George Washington at the time showed army stockpiles were sufficient for 9 rounds per man. By 1777, the privateers and merchantmen brought in over 2 million pounds of gunpowder and saltpeter.

Privateer John Manley captured the Nancy, supplying the American army with 2,000 muskets, 31 tons of musket shot, 7,000 round-shot for cannon, and other ammunition. Captain Jonathan Haraden from Salem, Massachusetts, who captured 1,000 British cannon, was considered one of the best sea-fighters, successfully taking on three armed British ships at the same time. Privateers captured countless British reinforcements and over 10,000 seamen, keeping them out of the British Navy.

In 1777, there were 11,000 privateers at sea intercepting British shipping in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and even between Ireland and England.

Together, the Continental Navy and privateers captured 16,000 British prisoners, a substantial contribution in comparison with the 15,000 prisoners taken by the entire Continental Army before the surrender at Yorktown. The crew of the privateers were well paid for their hazardous work, earning as much as $1,000 for one voyage, while average pay at the time was $9 per month.

About 55,000 American seamen served aboard the privateers. When captured by the British Navy, they were given a choice: join the British Navy or prison. The conditions of captivity aboard the prison ships, mostly abandoned ships moored in New York harbor, were inhuman. The most infamous of these was the HMS Jersey. About 11,000 privateers died of disease and malnutrition, their bodies dumped onto the mud flats of Wallabout Bay, where Brooklyn Navy Yard now stands.

These Mariners lost their lives in the founding of our Nation and were a major factor in the winning of the Revolution.

Declaration of Independence

The Declaration of Independence was largely the work of Virginian Thomas Jefferson. The declaration features the immortal lines, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” It then goes on to present a long list of grievances that provided the rationale for rebellion. On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress voted to approve a Virginia motion calling for separation from Britain. The dramatic words of this resolution were added to the closing of the Declaration of Independence.

Two days later, on July 4, the declaration was formally adopted by 12 colonies after minor revision. New York, the 13th colony, approved it on July 19. On August 2, the declaration was signed.

Many Americans celebrate Independence Day with fireworks and patriotic displays of red, white and blue, just as the founding fathers commemorated the Fourth of July at the end of the Revolutionary War. 

This is a time for us to reflect on how we can best uphold the same ideals that drove our founding fathers to sign the Declaration of Independence on July 4th, 1776:

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, which among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” 

Five Reasons Your Kids Should Sail

 

1. Self-Confidence. There is simply nothing like being able to pilot your own craft at the age of 9 years old. Riding a bike is one thing. Skillfully steering and docking a sailboat is quite another. All of my athletic endeavors helped to shape my sense of self as a kid, but sailing was without a doubt the most instrumental. I have not only noticed this in myself; during my ten years as a sailing instructor, I have seen it again and again in my students.

2. Spatial awareness. When kids learn how to navigate a boat through narrow spaces and tight turns – how to avoid collisions, coast to a dock with finesse, or squeeze into a packed starting line at a regatta – they develop a spatial awareness that will bring them prowess all activities that involve coordination. Like driving, for instance.

3. Sense of direction. When I was 10 years old, I would sail all week with my class, and then go out on weekends by myself. I would pack a lunch and take my Optimist out for a couple of hours to explore. I believe that it was on those trips that I began to develop a good sense of direction. Noticing which direction I had come from, picking out landmarks, and knowing how to get back became a regular part of my stream of consciousness. That awareness is crucial to having a sense of direction.

4. Weather knowledge. Do you know from which direction thunder storms normally come? Do you know what the water temperature normally is on Long Island Sound in May? If your child is a sailor, he or she will know. Weather knowledge will come in handy both on-the-water and on land.

5. Shipshape habits. Sailing students learn how to properly rig and unrig a boat. Kids learn to put things away in the right place, and keep them tidy while on the water. That’s a skill no mom or dad can argue with. Longshore Sailing School even has a shipshape award for every class to encourage the behavior.

So if your kids haven’t tried sailing, have them give it a try. Teaching a kid to sail is to give them a gift for life. They might not stick with it, but after they age out of all the other youth sports, the sailing skills are still there. I’ve seen many people return to sailing after an extended absence.

CollectiveEvolution Invention

Look, I just had to share this again. A tiny short video post. I shared this video on my personal facebook page a few months ago, but I have to say this is really a fantastic idea for deploying where trash tends to congregate on the water, and I had to share it with my fellow American Seafarers. Hey, how about dropping one of these in the water when we dock up or grab a mooring. If everyone did this imagine how much trash would be removed from our waters with no more effort than dropping a bucket, and throwing away the trash it collects. I have to hand it to these guys.

New Board Member – Sri Dhyana

American Seafarers

Sri Dhyana, Board of Directors, Director of Science Programs
American Seafarers

I wanted to take a few minutes to introduce and to welcome Sri Dhyana to our board of directors and to our leadership team. Sri comes with an impressive and diverse background that includes Sailing, the Sciences, and Mechanics. I met Sri as a dockmate in Kittery Maine. We are both part-time live-aboard sailors, and we both work at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. Over the last several months, we have become friends and as usual conversation goes talked about our pasts and where we want to be in the future. After a while it became clear that Sri would become an excellent member of our team. In fact on the day I intended to share my interest in her joining American Seafarers, she beat me to it. She wanted to talk to me about just that. While reviewing her CV, I became very excited about the diversity of her professional background, her education and history of community service and outreach that aligns so well with our mission.

Sri graduated from the University of Southern Maine with a B.A. in Physics, with honors and as a member of several fellowships, including fellowships with NASA and the National Science Foundation. She served for 9 years in the U.S. Army National Guard for the State of Maine. While serving in the guard, Sri was deployed for Operation Iraqi Freedom and when her unit came home she returned decorated for her conduct and service.

Sri has spent time with several organizations and labs researching Astrobiology, Environmental Toxicology, Genetic Damage, as well as other highly specialized fields of study and practice working with or for NASA, USM, The Scripps Research Institute, and Wise Lab of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology. Additionally she has worked as an education facilitator with Mad Science of Maine, an organization that specializes in providing experiential learning techniques to elementary school children.

Sri’s outreach and community service is also pretty extensive. While she was the President of the USM Physics Club, she designed physical demonstrations for high school science classrooms learning programs, ferrying students and staff to Cow Island to participate in the Ripple Effect Project. Concurrently as the Vice President of the USM Chemistry Club, she volunteered to perform chemistry demonstrations to middle school students. And again, as the Vice President of the USM Biology Club, she organized events and fundraisers to send students on educational field trips that she helped develop and plan. She was also a crew member at Star Pal, helping underprivileged children get involved in sailing and sailboat racing in greater Portland, ME

Sri is also a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, Society of Physics Students, The American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Association for Women in Science and past member of the USM Sailing Team. She has been and currently is working towards receiving her U.S.C.G. Captain’s license Master of Vessels.

As you can see, Sri Dhyana is going to make an excellent team member, and I am excited to introduce her to you as a member of our Board of Directors and Director of Science Programs. We look forward to Sri working independently and in conjunction with our educational partners developing some amazing ocean science programs for our kids and we look forward to sailing with her as a Captain of American Seafarers.

How American Seafarers Can Help Your Child

The advantages of a summer program are numerous, and far more than those you might just think of. Learn more in this article.

Unlike the perceptible advantages that children gain from our summer expedition sailing program, the intangible advantages are harder to pin down. In conjunction with home and school, and maybe even a summer job, our program works with the many building blocks that create an adult. And while few children realize how much they’ve been influenced by their summer experiences as exploring sailors, as adults they will see how their lives were enriched and layers were added to their development.

A summer program offers communal living

Beyond facilities and activity schedules, the people whom your children encounter — shipmates, offers, and the people they meet at each destination— play an influential role. Kids living in shipboard situations soon find out that when they don’t treat one another well, there are consequences. As they learn and work together, they build a sense of community. If one person chooses not to cooperate, the whole group is affected. When they work well together, the whole teams feels the benefits of a done well done. It happens, and it’s a part of life that even as adults we witness and experience, and of course the experience of the staff is a key factor in guiding the individual and the group away from conflict and rather towards while allowing the kids to be key to a successful resolution. It is almost inevitable that the kids will face social challenges with the new people with whom they are living closely, however; in the end, they will grow through the experience of becoming an important part of the sailing crew, and share a singular unrivaled commraderie with the rest of their crew

Gaining new perspective

Chris Yager takes small groups of teens off the beaten path in Asia with his student summer program Where There Be Dragons. Teens, who are in the throes of questioning their social, political, and economic environment see themselves in another light as a result of being in such a foreign setting, notes Yager. He contends that when teens are far from their normal circumstances, they react in new ways. Kids who have never been leaders take charge. The popular outgoing teen becomes the quiet observer. It is a wonderful experience for a child or teen to come to a place where he or she is an unknown entity and freed from his or her usual context.

Trying new things

Trying out new things is another significant intangible benefit of a summer youth program. At home and in school, children can and often do dodge new experiences. At sea, they can’t. Of course, the primary goal of any well-run program is fun. Independence from parents also exerts a strong influence. The child who is away from home encounters new experiences independently. With the safety net of insightful staff children can risk finding out what works and what doesn’t in interpersonal relationships, tryout new shipboard skills, all while discovering new strengths and new facets of themselves.

Choosing a summer program

Though summer programs and camps can have a deep impact on a child’s development, not all summer programs have what it takes — a well-thought out philosophy, a mature and alert staff, and counselors who provide excellent role models and give kids a fun time. By looking at the intangibles, you can choose a program wisely.

American Seafarers allows your kids to explore their world in an entirely new way, and they develop a completely new set of skills that of course include sailing, but also those other intangible skills that help kids become adults that have a much better sense of how to interact with their peers, and their self worth and character.

A Northern Winter on a Sailboat

I am not going to write about the wonders of winter sailing. I sailed to Maine in the Month of December before it really froze up here (I still had to break ice in Plymouth, MA to get out of that harbor), and I will tell you winter sailing isn’t much fun. You don’t do it because it’s a relaxing voyage, you do it because you have a purpose. I sailed here to Maine so I had a place to stay while I worked on a contract at the Shipyard. Living on a boat in winter is a different experience, although I have the advantage of shore power while docked, managing heat is still an issue when it gets super cold, like 25 degrees below zero and the wind is blowing through the harbor at 45 knots. Then it’s just hunker down under a few layer of blankets while the heater’s real job is to keep the bilge and bilge pump from freezing.

 

Here are a few pictures of a nautical winter wonderland.

Summer Camps by Jeffrey Carter

Jeffrey Carter is the Director of Rockbrook Summer Camp for Girls, a traditional girls summer camp located in Brevard, NC. He publishes the summer camp blog “The Heart of a Wooded Mountain.”
I wanted to share one of Jeffrey’s articles about Summer Camp with you, and draw some comparison with seafaring as a backdrop for some of these experiences. Some of the topics he discusses directly point to the benefits that a team working and mutual benefit program like American Seafarers brings to our youth, while other points he makes have analogs that translate well, but aren’t immediately apparent in the article because the image of summer camp is often thought of a place with cabins in the woods and doing endless activities during the day. American Seafarers is much more than a summer camp, because we are bringing the camp with us on a grand adventure that allows the kids to realize their real value and potential by being the team that makes it happen for all of us. Not only do we teach your kids how to sail, our program experiencially teaches them to be responsible and accountable to themselves and to others, and also that the effort put in gives you the time later when it ok to just let loose and enjoy life and enjoy the fruits of the effort you put in to it.

Parents send their children to summer camps to have fun, to experience new activities, and maybe to see a different part of the country, but there are also some incredibly important, and lasting, benefits that campers enjoy. What can parents expect their children to gain from their summer camp experience beyond the razzle-dazzle entertainment? What will stick with your kids after camp and when they’re back at home? Here are a few of the areas of self-development a summer camp experience can enhance.

Relating to others: Summer camps are highly social environments where everyone is a member of a close-knit community. At the same time, they are often quite diverse. Children will meet others from different families, from different parts of the country, even from abroad. They will also interact daily with children of different ages. These different backgrounds, values, habits and ways of living can be disconcerting at first, but with encouragement and guidance can really help a young person learn to get along with people. Another way to say this, is that by encountering kids who are “different” a child learns to see past those differences and become friends. Learning to relate like this makes it much easier to make friends later in life.

Developing Creativity: Most summer camps provide numerous opportunities to make things, to practice different crafts, and to explore the arts. From woodworking, to fiber arts, to ceramics, to knitting, to blacksmithing, and so on, there are fantastic ways to be creative. Plus, kids are encouraged to try new things, to not worry about how “good” they are, and to be excited about the process of participating. Everyone realizes that we can create some pretty cool stuff if we give it a try.

Self-Confidence: Summer camps are supportive places, communities where everyone will look out for each other, and usually encourage each other. This kind of positive peer relationship is the perfect recipe for trying new things and being proud of your accomplishments. Kids might think they won’t be able to do something (like climb a ropes course, for example), but when they try and succeed, it’s strong evidence that they can do it. Doubt is transformed into bravery, fear into confidence, and the result is an enhanced sense of self-worth.

Independence: It’s almost inevitable when a child goes to camp and sleeps away from home, away from the watchful eye of his or her parents- she will gain greater independence. Kids at camp make a lot of their own decisions, make choices about what to do, how to behave, and how to spend their free time. Of course, they also get to see the consequences of their choices too, and when it’s their choice and not their parents, those consequences are all the more meaningful.

Being suddenly responsible for their own choices, is a very formative experience in a growing habit of independence.

Social Etiquette: Being around so many people and interacting with them so closely day after day, summer camps also require kids to develop certain social skills. Sharing, recognizing others’ interests, dealing with arguments, showing empathy, being kind, offering to help, making honest suggestions- all of these are key ingredients. Every quality summer camp will create an environment where all of this is fostered and taught.

Of course most of these areas can develop at home and at school during the year, but summer camp provides an opportunity to practice these qualities, develop these aspects of a child’s personality, and further develop the mature skill that make them effective. It’s really remarkable how powerful the summer camp experience is in this regard. Sure it’s fun, but it can also be so crucially formative too.

At American Seafarers, kids gain confidence because of their successes in their accomplishments as a team, by working together to develop a plan and charting the next leg of our course, and thinking creatively about the best way to approach new challenges they haven’t experienced yet. I think Jeffrey would agree there is nothing more powerful than your kids’ successes contributing to the success of the whole team and its ability to get something real accomplished from start to finish and enjoying the end results, whether that seeing a new beach, or visiting an amazing landmark. This isn’t running the ropes course, but being part of how the entire group gets to visit one amazing location after another, and being relied upon and enjoying the sense of accomplishment by being a member of the crew that made the summer such a grand adventure, there can be no other real sense of being independent by virtue of trusting in yourself and you ability to be responsible when needed.